The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-430

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

[FN#502]Arab. “Y� Satt�r” = Thou who veilest the discreditable secrets of Thy creatures. [FN#503] Arab. “Nasr�ni,” a follower of Him of Nazareth and an older name than “Christian” which (Acts xi., 26) was first given at Antioch about A.D. 43. The cry in Alexandria used to be “Ya Nasr�ni, Kalb aw�ni!”=O Nazarene! O dog obscene! (Pilgrimage i., 160).). “Christian” in Arabic can be expressed only by “Mas�hi” = follower of the Messiah. [FN#504] Arab. “Tasb�h,” = Saluting in the Subh (morning). [FN#505] In the East women stand on minor occasions while men squat on their hunkers in a way hardly possible to an untrained European. The custom is old. Herodotus (ii., 35) says, “The women stand up when they make water, but the men sit down.” Will it be believed that Canon Rawlinson was too modest to leave this passage in his translation? The custom was perpetuated by Al-Islam because the position prevents the ejection touching the clothes and making them ceremonially impure; possibly they borrowed it from the Guebres. Dabistan, Gate xvi. says, “It is improper, whilst in an erect posture, to make water, it is therefore necessary to sit at squat and force it to some distance, repeating the Avesta mentally.” [FN#506] This is still a popular form of the “Kinchin lay,” and as the turbands are often of fine stuff, the petite industrie pays well. [FN#507]Arab. “Wali” =Governor; the term still in use for the Governor General of a Province as opposed to the “Muh�fiz,” or district-governor. In Eastern Arabia the Wali is the Civil Governor opposed to the Amir or Military