The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-411

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

93). [FN#396] Arab. “Faraj�yah,” a long-sleeved robe worn by the learned (Lane, M.E., chapt. i.). [FN#397] Arab. “Sarr�f” (vulg. Sayrafi), whence the Anglo-Indian “Shroff,” a familiar corruption. [FN#398] Arab. “Yah�di” which is less polite than “Ban� Isr�il” = Children of Israel. So in Christendom “Israelite” when in favour and “Jew” (with an adjective or a participle) when nothing is wanted of him. [FN#399] Also called “Ghilm�n” = the beautiful youths appointed to serve the True Believers in Paradise. The Koran says (chapt. lvi. 9 etc.) “Youths, which shall continue in their bloom for ever, shall go round about to attend them, with goblets, and beakers, and a cup of flowing wine,” etc. Mohammed was an Arab (not a Persian, a born pederast) and he was too fond of women to be charged with love of boys: even Tristam Shandy (vol. vii. chapt. 7; “No, quoth a third; the gentleman has been committing— —”) knew that the two tastes are incompatibles. But this and other passages in the Koran have given the Chevaliers de la Pallie a hint that the use of boys, like that of wine, here forbidden, will be permitted in Paradise. [FN#400] Which, by the by, is the age of an oldish old maid in Egypt. I much doubt puberty being there earlier than in England where our grandmothers married at fourteen. But Orientals are aware that the period of especial feminine