The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-407

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

(O.S.), thus corresponding with the Persian Nau-roz, vernal equinox and introducing the fifty days of “Khammas�n” or “Mir�si” (hot desert winds). On awakening, the people smell and bathe their temples with vinegar in which an onion has been soaked and break their fast with a “fisikh” or dried “b�ri” = mullet from Lake Menzalah: the late Hekekiyan Bey had the fish-heads counted in one public garden and found 70,000. The rest of the day is spent out of doors “Gypsying,” and families greatly enjoy themselves on these occasions. For a longer description, see a paper by my excellent friend Yacoub Artin Pasha, in the Bulletin de l’Institut �gyptien, 2nd series, No. 4, Cairo, 1884. I have noticed the Mir�si (south-wester) and other winds in the Land of Midian, i., 23. [FN#379] So in the days of the “Mameluke Beys” in Egypt a man of rank would not cross the street on foot. [FN#380] Arab. Basrah. The city is now in decay and not to flourish again till the advent of the Euphrates Valley R.R., is a modern place, founded in A.H. 15, by the Caliph Omar upon the Aylah, a feeder of the Tigris. Here, according to Al-Har�ri, the “whales and the lizards meet,” and, as the tide affects the river, Its stream shows prodigy, ebbing and flowing. In its far-famed market-place, Al-Marbad, poems used to be recited; and the city was famous for its mosques and Saint-shrines, fair women and school of Grammar which rivalled that of K�fah. But already in Al-Hariri’s day (nat. A.H. 446 = A.D. 1030) Baghdad had drawn off much of its population. [FN#381] This fumigation (Bukh�r) is still used. A little incense or perfumed wood is burnt upon an open censor (Mibkharah) of earthenware or metal, and passed round, each guest holding it for a few moments under his beard. In the Somali County, the very home of incense, both sexes fumigate the whole person