The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-405

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

down on the marriage-day and the other half when the husband dies or divorces his wife. But if she take a divorce she forfeits her right to it, and obscene fellows, especially Persians, often compel her to demand divorce by unnatural and preposterous use of her person. [FN#366] Bismillah here means “Thou art welcome to it.” [FN#367] Arab. “Bassak,” half Pers. (bas = enough) and—ak = thou; for thee. “Bas” sounds like our “buss” (to kiss) and there are sundry good old Anglo-Indian jokes of feminine mistakes on the subject. [FN#368] This saving clause makes the threat worse. The scene between the two brothers is written with characteristic Arab humour; and it is true to nature. In England we have heard of a man who separated from his wife because he wished to dine at six and she preferred half-past six. [FN#369] Arab. “Misr.” (vulg. Masr). The word, which comes of a very ancient house, was applied to the present capital about the time of its conquest by the Osmanli Turks A.H. 923 = 1517. [FN#370] The Arab. “J�zah,” = skirt, edge; the modern village is the site of an ancient Egyptian city, as the “Ghizah inscription” proves (Brugsch, History of Egypt, ii. 415) [FN#371] Arab. “Watan” literally meaning “birth-place” but also used for “patria, native country”; thus “Hubb al￾Watan” = patriotism. The Turks pronounce it “Vatan,” which the French have turned it into Va-t’en!