The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-386

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

[FN#275] Arab. “Sukkar-nab�t.” During my day (1842-49) we had no other sugar in the Bombay Presidency. [FN#276] This is one of the myriad Arab instances that the decrees of “Anagk�,” Fate, Destiny, Weird, are inevitable. The situation is highly dramatic; and indeed The Nights, as will appear in the Terminal Essay, have already suggested a national drama. [FN#277] Having lately been moved by Ajib. [FN#278] Mr. Payne (i. 131) omits these lines which appear out of place; but this mode of inappropriate quotation is a characteristic of Eastern tales. [FN#279] Anglic� “him.” [FN#280] This march of the tribe is a lieu commun of Arab verse e.g. the poet Labid’s noble elegy on the “Deserted Camp.” We shall find scores of instances in The Nights. [FN#281] I have heard of such sands in the Desert east of Damascus which can be crossed only on boards or camel furniture; and the same is reported