The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-351

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

[FN#139] This is Mr. Thackeray’s “nose-bag.” I translate by “walking-shoes” the Arab “Khuff” which are a manner of loose boot covering the ankle; they are not usually embroidered, the ornament being reserved for the inner shoe. [FN#140] i.e. Syria (says Abulfeda) the “land on the left” (of one facing the east) as opposed to Al-Yaman the “land on the right.” Osmani would mean Turkish, Ottoman. When Bernard the Wise (Bohn, p.24) speaks of “Bagada and Axiam” (Mabillon’s text) or “Axinarri” (still worse), he means Baghdad and Ash-Sh�m (Syria, Damascus), the latter word puzzling his Editor. Richardson (Dissert, lxxii.) seems to support a hideous attempt to derive Sh�m from Sh�mat, a mole or wart, because the country is studded with hillocks! Al-Sh�m is often applied to Damascus-city whose proper name Dimishk belongs to books: this term is generally derived from Dam�shik b. K�li b. M�lik b. Sham (Shem). Lee (Ibn Bat�tah, 29) denies that ha-Dimishki means “Eliezer of Damascus.” [FN#141] From Oman = Eastern Arabia. [FN#142] Arab. “Tamar Hann�” lit. date of Henna, but applied to the flower of the eastern privet (Lawsonia inermis) which has the sweet scent of freshly mown hay. The use of Henna as a dye is known even in Enland. The “myrtle” alluded to may either have been for a perfume (as it is held an anti-intoxicant) or for eating, the bitter aromatic berries of the “�s” being supposed to flavour wine and especially Raki (raw brandy). [FN#143] Lane. (i. 211) pleasantly remarks, “A list of these sweets is given in my original, but I have thought it better to omit the names” (!) Dozy does not shirk his duty, but he is not much more satisfactory in explaining words interesting to students because they are unfound in dictionaries and forgotten by the people. “Akr�s (cakes) Laymun�yah (of limes) wa Maymun�yah” appears in the Bresl. Edit. as “Ma’amuniyah” which may mean “Ma’amun’s cakes” or “delectable cakes.” “Amsh�t” =