The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-336

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

A.D. 785, = A.H. 169. But we can lay no stress on this date which may be merely fanciful. Professor Tawney very justly compares this Moslem Solomon with the Hindu King, Vikram�ditya, who ruled over the seven divisions of the world and who had as many devils to serve him as he wanted. [FN#69] Arab. “Y� Ba’�d:” a euphemism here adopted to prevent using grossly abusive language. Others will occur in the course of these pages. [FN#70] i. e. about to fly out; “My heart is in my mouth.” The Fisherman speaks with the dry humour of a Fellah. [FN#71] “Sulayman,” when going out to ease himself, entrusted his seal-ring upon which his kingdom depended to a concubine “Am�nah” (the “Faithful”), when Sakhr, transformed to the King’s likeness, came in and took it. The prophet was reduced to beggary, but after forty days the demon fled throwing into the sea the ring which was swallowed by a fish and eventually returned to Sulayman. This Talmudic fable is hinted at in the Koran (chaps. xxxviii.), and commentators have extensively embroidered it. Asaf, son of Barkhiya, was Wazir to Sulayman and is supposed to be the “one with whom was the knowledge of the Scriptures” (Koran, chaps. xxxvii.), i.e. who knew the Ineffable Name of Allah. See the manifest descendant of the Talmudic Koranic fiction in the “Tale of the Emperor Jovinian” (No. lix.) of the Gesta Romanorum, the most popular book of medi�val Europe composed in England (or Germany) about the end of the thirteenth century. [FN#72] Arab. “Kumkam,” a gourd-shaped bottle of metal, china or glass, still used for sprinkling scents. Lane gives an illustration (chaps. viii., Mod. Egypt.).