The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-328

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

Galland for the second prefers Dinarzade (?) and Richardson Dinazade (Din�z�d = Religion-freer): here I have followed Lane and Payne; though in “First Footsteps” I was misled by Galland. See Vol. ii. p. 1. [FN#22] Probably she proposed to “Judith” the King. These learned and clever young ladies are very dangerous in the East. [FN#23] In Egypt, etc., the bull takes the place of the Western ox. The Arab. word is “Taur” (Thaur, Saur); in old Persian “Tore” and Lat. “Taurus,” a venerable remnant of the days before the “Semitic” and “Aryan’> families of speech had split into two distinct growths. “Taur” ends in the Saxon “Steor” and the English “Steer “ [FN#24] Arab. “Ab� Yakz�n” = the Wakener, because the ass brays at dawn. [FN#25] Arab. “Tibn”; straw crushed under the sledge: the hay of Egypt, Arabia, Syria, etc. The old country custom is to pull up the corn by handfuls from the roots, leaving the land perfectly bare: hence the “plucking up” of Hebrew Holy Writ. The object is to preserve every atom of “Tibn.” [FN#26] Arab. “Y� Aftah”: Al-Aftah is an epithet of the bull, also of the chameleon. [FN#27] Arab. “Bal�d,” a favourite Egyptianism often pleasantly confounded with “Wali” (a Santon), hence the latter comes to mean “an innocent,” a “ninny.”