The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-318

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

every honey fritter and half that quantity of ambergris.” All this time my brother kept wagging head and jaws till the master cried, “Enough of this. Bring us the dessert!” Then said he to him,’ “Eat of these almonds and walnuts and raisins; and of this and that (naming divers kinds of dried fruits), and be not abashed.” But my brother replied, “O my lord, indeed I am full: I can eat no more.” “O my guest,” repeated the host, “if thou have a mind to these good things eat: Allah! Allah![FN#691] do not remain hungry;” but my brother rejoined, “O my lord, he who hath eaten of all these dishes how can he be hungry?” Then he considered and said to himself, “I will do that shall make him repent of these pranks.” Presently the entertainer called out “Bring me the wine;” and, moving his hands in the air, as though they had set it before them, he gave my brother a cup and said, “Take this cup and, if it please thee, let me know.” “O my lord,” he replied, “it is notable good as to nose but I am wont to drink wine some twenty years old.” “Knock then at this door,”[FN#692] quoth the host “for thou canst not drink of aught better.” “By thy kindness,” said my brother, motioning with his hand as though he were drinking. “Health and joy to thee,” exclaimed the house master and feigned to fill a cup and drink it off; then he handed another to my brother who quaffed it and made as if he were drunken. Presently he took the host unawares; and, raising his arm till the white of his armpit appeared, dealt him such a cuff on the nape of his neck that the palace echoed to it. Then he came down upon him with a second cuff and the entertainer cried aloud “What is this, O thou scum of the earth?” “O my lord,” replied my brother, “thou hast shown much kindness to thy slave, and admitted him into thine abode and given him to eat of thy victual; then thou madest him drink of thine old wine till he became drunken and boisterous; but thou art too noble not to bear with his ignorance and pardon his offence.” When the Barmaki heard my brother’s words he laughed his loudest and said, “Long have I been wont to make mock of men and play the madcap among my intimates, but never yet have I come across a single one who had the patience and the wit to enter into all my humours save thyself: so I forgive thee, and thou shalt be my boon companion in very sooth and never leave me.” Then he ordered the servants to lay the table in earnest and they set on all the dishes of which he had spoken in sport; and he and my brother ate till they were satisfied; after which they removed to the drinking chamber, where they found damsels like moons who