The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-316

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

fell foul of him and stripped and beat him and docked his ears; but I heard tidings of his misfortunes and went out after him taking him clothes; and brought him secretly into the city where I assigned to him an allowance for meat and drink. And presently the Caliph gave ear to The Barber’s Tale of his Sixth Brother. My sixth brother, O Commander of the Faithful, Shakashik,[FN#683] or Many clamours, the shorn of both lips, was once rich and became poor, so one day he went out to beg somewhat to keep life in him. As he was on the road he suddenly caught sight of a large and handsome mansion, with a detached building wide and lofty at the entrance, where sat sundry eunuchs bidding and forbidding.[FN#684] My brother enquired of one of those idling there and he replied “The palace belongs to a scion of the Barmaki house;” so he stepped up to the door keepers and asked an alms of them “Enter,” said they, “by the great gate and thou shalt get what thou seekest from the Wazir our master.” Accordingly he went in and, passing through the outer entrance, walked on a while and presently came to a mansion of the utmost beauty and elegance, paved with marble, hung with curtains and having in the midst of it a flower garden whose like he had never seen.[FN#685] My brother stood awhile as one bewildered not knowing whither to turn his steps; then, seeing the farther end of the sitting chamber tenanted, he walked up to it and there found a man of handsome presence and comely beard. When this personage saw my brother he stood up to him and welcomed him and asked him of his case; whereto he replied that he was in want and needed charity. Hearing these words the grandee showed great concern and, putting his hand to his fine robe, rent it exclaiming, “What! am I in a City, and thou here an hungered? I have not patience to bear such disgrace!” Then he promised him all manner of good cheer and said, “There is no help but that thou stay with me and eat of my salt.”[FN#686] “O my lord,” answered my brother, “I can wait no longer; for I am indeed dying of hunger.” So he cried, “Ho boy! bring basin and ewer;” and, turning to my brother, said, “O my guest come forward and wash thy hands.” My brother rose to do so but