The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-300

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

knew naught of the malice of women. As soon as it was dusk, the slave girl came to him and carried him to the house, and when the lady saw him she said to him, “By Allah, O my lord, I have been longing exceedingly for thee.” “By Allah,” cried he, “kiss me quick before thou give me aught else.”[FN#642] Hardly had he spoken, when the lady’s husband came in from the next room[FN#643] and seized him, saying, “By Allah, I will not let thee go, till I deliver thee to the chief of the town watch.” My brother humbled himself to him; but he would not listen to him and carried him before the Prefect who gave him an hundred lashes with a whip and, mounting him on a camel, promenaded him round about the city, whilst the guards proclaimed aloud, “This is his reward who violateth the Harims of honourable men!” Moreover, he fell off the camel and broke his leg and so became lame. Then the Prefect banished him from the city; and he went forth unknowing whither he should wend; but I heard of him and fearing for him went out after him and brought him back secretly to the city and restored him to health and took him into my house where he still liveth. The Caliph laughed at my story and said, “Thou hast done well, O Samit, O Silent Man, O spare of speech!”; and he bade me take a present and go away. But I said, “I will accept naught of thee except I tell thee what befell all my other brothers; and do not think me a man of many words.” So the Caliph gave ear to The Barber’s Tale of his Second Brother. Know, O Commander of the Faithful, that my second brother’s name was Al￾Haddar, that is the Babbler, and he was the paralytic. Now it happened to him one day, as he was going about his business, that an old woman accosted him and said, “Stop a little, my good man, that I may tell thee of somewhat which, if it be to thy liking, thou shalt do for me and I will pray Allah to give thee good of it!” My brother stopped and she went on, “I will put thee in the way of a certain thing, so thou not be prodigal of speech.” “On with thy talk,” quoth he; and she, “What sayest thou to handsome quarters and a fair garden with flowing waters, flowers blooming, and fruit growing, and old wine going and a pretty young face whose owner thou mayest embrace from dark till dawn? If thou do whatso I bid thee thou shalt see something greatly to thy advantage.” “And is all this in the world?” asked my brother; and she answered, “Yes, and it shall be thine, so thou