The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-299

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

none came to help him; and he was forced to grind the wheat till hard upon dawn, when the house master came in and, seeing my brother still tethered to the yoke and the man flogging him, went away. At day break the miller returned home and left him still yoked and half dead; and soon after in came the slave girl who unbound him, and said to him, “I and my lady are right sorry for what hath happened and we have borne thy grief with thee.” But he had no tongue wherewith to answer her from excess of beating and mill turning. Then he retired to his lodging and behold, the clerk who had drawn up the marriage deed came to him[FN#641] and saluted him, saying, “Allah give thee long life! May thy espousal be blessed! This face telleth of pleasant doings and dalliance and kissing and clipping from dusk to dawn.” “Allah grant the liar no peace, O thou thousandfold cuckold!”, my brother replied, “by Allah, I did nothing but turn the mill in the place of the bull all night till morning!” “Tell me thy tale,” quoth he; and my brother recounted what had befallen him and he said, “Thy star agrees not with her star; but an thou wilt I can alter the contract for thee,” adding, “‘Ware lest another cheat be not in store for thee.” And my brother answered him, “See if thou have not another contrivance.” Then the clerk left him and he sat in his shop, looking for some one to bring him a job whereby he might earn his day’s bread. Presently the handmaid came to him and said, “Speak with my lady.” “Begone, O my good girl,” replied he, “there shall be no more dealings between me and thy lady.” The handmaid returned to her mistress and told her what my brother had said and presently she put her head out of the window, weeping and saying, “Why, O my beloved, are there to be no more dealings ‘twixt me and thee?” But he made her no answer. Then she wept and conjured him, swearing that all which had befallen him in the mill was not sanctioned by her and that she was innocent of the whole matter. When he looked upon her beauty and loveliness and heard the sweetness of her speech, the sorrow which had possessed him passed from his heart; he accepted her excuse and he rejoiced in her sight. So he saluted her and talked with her and sat tailoring awhile, after which the handmaid came to him and said, “My mistress greeteth thee and informeth thee that her husband purposeth to lie abroad this night in the house of some intimate friends of his; so, when he is gone, do thou come to us and spend the night with my lady in delightsomest joyance till the morning.” Now her husband had asked her, “How shall we manage to turn him away from thee?”; and she answered, “Leave me to play him another trick and make him a laughing stock for all the town.” But my brother