The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-284

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

replied he, “if thou but knew what is about to befall thee, thou wouldst do nothing this day, and I counsel thee to act as I tell thee by computation of the constellations.” “By Allah,” said I, “never did I see a barber who excelled in judicial astrology save thyself: but I think and I know that thou art most prodigal of frivolous talk. I sent for thee only to shave my head, but thou comest and pesterest me with this sorry prattle.” “What more wouldst thou have?” replied he. “Allah hath bounteously bestowed on thee a Barber who is an astrologer, one learned in alchemy and white magic;[FN#612] syntax, grammar, and lexicology; the arts of logic, rhetoric and elocution; mathematics, arithmetic and algebra; astronomy, astromancy and geometry; theology, the Traditions of the Apostle and the Commentaries on the Koran. Furthermore, I have read books galore and digested them and have had experience of affairs and comprehended them. In short I have learned the theorick and the practick of all the arts and sciences; I know everything of them by rote and I am a past master in tota re scibili. Thy father loved me for my lack of officiousness, argal, to serve thee is a religious duty incumbent on me. I am no busy body as thou seemest to suppose, and on this account I am known as The Silent Man, also, The Modest Man. Wherefore it behoveth thee to render thanks to Allah Almighty and not cross me, for I am a true counsellor to thee and benevolently minded towards thee. Would that I were in thy service a whole year that thou mightest do me justice; and I would ask thee no wage for all this.” When I heard his flow of words, I said to him, “Doubtless thou wilt be my death this day!”—And Shahrazad perceived the dawn of day and ceased saying her permitted say. When it was the Thirtieth Night, She said, It hath reached me, O auspicious King, that the young man said to the Barber, “Thou certainly will be the death of me this very day!” “O master mine,” replied he, “I am he, The Silent Man hight, by reason of the fewness of my words, to distinguish me from my six brothers. For the eldest is called Al-Bakb�k, the prattler; the second Al-Hadd�r, the babbler; the third Al-Fak�k, the gabbler; the fourth, his name is Al-Kuz al￾asw�ni, the long necked Gugglet, from his eternal chattering; the fifth is Al￾Nashsh�r, the tattler and tale teller; the sixth Shak�shik, or many clamours; and the seventh is famous as Al-S�mit, The Silent Man, and this is my noble self!” Whilst he redoubled his talk, I thought my gall bladder would have burst;