The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-282

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

By and by the old woman returned looking chopfallen,[FN#605] and said, “O my son, do not ask me how I fared with her! When I told her that, she cried at me, ‘If thou hold not thy peace, O hag of ill omen, and leave not such talk, I will entreat thee as thou deservest and do thee die by the foulest of deaths.’ But needs must I have at her a second time.”[FN#606] When I heard this it added ailment to my ailment and the neighbours visited me and judged that I was not long for this world; but after some days, the old woman came to me and, putting her mouth close to my ear, whispered, “O my son; I claim from thee the gift of good news.” With this my soul returned to me and I said, “Whatever thou wilt shall be thine.” Thereupon she began, “Yesterday I went to the young lady who, seeing me broken in spirit and shedding tears from reddened eyes, asked me, ‘O naunty[FN#607] mine, what ails thee, that I see thy breast so straitened?’; and I answered her, weeping bitterly, ‘O my lady, I am just come from the house of a youth who loves thee and who is about to die for sake of thee!’ Quoth she (and her heart was softened), ‘And who is this youth of whom thou speakest?’; and quoth I, ‘He is to me as a son and the fruit of my vitals. He saw thee, some days ago, at the window watering thy flowers and espying thy face and wrists he fell in love at first sight. I let him know what happened to me the last time I was with thee, whereupon his ailment increased, he took to the pillow and he is naught now but a dead man, and no doubt what ever of it.’ At this she turned pale and asked, ‘All this for my sake?’; and I answered, ‘Ay, by Allah! [FN#608] what wouldst thou have me do?’ Said she, ‘Go back to him and greet him for me and tell him that I am twice more heartsick than he is. And on Friday, before the hour of public prayer, bid him here to the house, and I will come down and open the door for him. Then I will carry him up to my chamber and foregather with him for a while, and let him depart before my father return from the Mosque.’” When I heard the old woman’s words, all my sickness suddenly fell from me, my anguish ceased and my heart was comforted; I took off what clothes were on me and gave them to her and, as she turned to go, she said, “Keep a good heart!” “I have not a jot of sorrow left.” I replied. My household and intimates rejoiced in my recovery and I abode thus till Friday, when behold, the old woman came in and asked me how I did, to which I answered that I was well and in good case. Then I donned my clothes and perfumed myself and sat down to await the congregation going in to prayers, that I might betake myself to her. But the old woman said to me, “Thou hast time and to spare: so thou wouldst do well to go to the Hammam and have thy hair shaven off (especially