The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-275

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

“How dear is our day and how lucky our lot, * When the cynic’s away with his tongue malign! When love and delight and the swimming of head * Send cleverness trotting, the best boon of wine. When the full moon shines from the cloudy veil, * And the branchlet sways in her greens that shine: When the red rose mantles in freshest cheek, And Narcissus[FN#588] opeth his love sick eyne: When pleasure with those I love is so sweet, When friendship with those I love is complete!” I rejoiced to see them, and lighted the candles after receiving them with gladness and delight. They doffed their heavy outer dresses and the new damsel uncovered her face when I saw that she was like the moon at its full never beheld I aught more beautiful. Then I rose and set meat and drink before them, and we ate and drank; and I kept giving mouthfuls to the new comer, crowning her cup and drinking with her till the first damsel, waxing inwardly jealous, asked me, “By Allah, is she not more delicious than I?”; whereto I answered, “Ay, by the Lord!” “It is my wish that thou lie with her this night; for I am thy mistress but she is our visitor. Upon my head be it, and my eyes.” Then she rose and spread the carpets for our bed[FN#589] and I took the young lady and lay with her that night till morning, when I awoke and found myself wet, as I thought, with sweat. I sat up and tried to arouse the damsel; but when I shook her by the shoulders my hand became crimson with blood and her head rolled off the pillow. Thereupon my senses fled and I cried aloud, saying, “O All powerful Protector, grant me Thy protection!” Then finding her neck had been severed, I sprung up and the world waxed black before my eyes, and I looked for the lady, my former love, but could not find her. So I knew that it was she who had murdered the damsel in her jealousy,[FN#590] and said, “There is no Majesty and there is no Might save in Allah, the Glorious, the Great! What is to be done now?” I considered awhile then, doffing my clothes, dug a hole in the middle of the court yard, wherein I laid the murdered girl with her jewellery and golden ornaments; and, throwing back the earth on her, replaced the slabs of the marble[FN#591] pavement. After this I made the Ghusl or total ablution,[FN#592] and put on pure clothes; then, taking what money I had left, locked up the house and summoned courage and went to its owner to whom I paid a year’s rent, saying, “I am about to join my uncles in Cairo.” Presently I set out and, journeying to Egypt, foregathered with