The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-273

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

rippling, on our rugs recline, Passing pure wine, and whoso leaves us there Shall ne’er arise from fall his woes design: Draining long draughts from large and brimming bowls, * Administ’ring thirst’s only medicine—wine. And what is there to compare with the Rasad, the Observatory, and its charms whereof every viewer as he approacheth saith, ‘Verily this spot is specialised with all manner of excellence!’ And if thou speak of the Night of Nile full, [FN#580] give the rainbow and distribute it![FN#581] And if thou behold The Garden at eventide, with the cool shades sloping far and wide, a marvel thou wouldst see and wouldst incline to Egypt in ecstasy. And wert thou by Cairo’s river side,[FN#582] when the sun is sinking and the stream dons mail coat and habergeon[FN#583] over its other vestments, thou wouldst be quickened to new life by its gentle zephyrs and by its all sufficient shade.” So spake he and the rest fell to describing Egypt and her Nile. As I heard their accounts, my thoughts dwelt upon the subject and when, after talking their fill, all arose and went their ways, I lay down to sleep that night, but sleep came not because of my violent longing for Egypt; and neither meat pleased me nor drink. After a few days my uncles equipped themselves for a trade journey to Egypt; and I wept before my father till he made ready for me fitting merchandise, and he consented to my going with them, saying however, “Let him not enter Cairo, but leave him to sell his wares at Damascus.” So I took leave of my father and we fared forth from Mosul and gave not over travelling till we reached Aleppo[FN#584] where we halted certain days. Then we marched onwards till we made Damascus and we found her a city as though she were a Paradise, abounding in trees and streams and birds and fruits of all kinds. We alighted at one of the Khans, where my uncles tarried awhile selling and buying; and they bought and sold also on my account, each dirham turning a profit of five on prime cost, which pleased me mightily. After this they left me alone and set their faces Egyptwards; whilst I abode at Damascus, where I had hired from a jeweller, for two dinars a month, a mansion[FN#585] whose beauties would beggar the tongue. Here I remained, eating and drinking and spending what monies I had in hand till, one day, as I was sitting at the door of my house be hold, there came up a young lady clad in costliest raiment never saw my eyes richer. I winked[FN#5886 at her and she stepped inside without hesitation and stood within. I entered with her and shut