The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-261

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

was a granary of sesame seed, whereof I sold part to thee; and I had neither time nor inclination to take count with thee till I had sold the rest of the stock in store; nor, indeed, even now have I made an end of receiving the price. So I desire thou baulk me not in what I am about to say to thee: twice have I eaten of thy food and I wish to give thee as a present the monies for the sesame which are by thee. Such is the cause of the cutting off my right hand and my eating with my left.” “Indeed,” said I, “thou hast shown me the utmost kindness and liberality.” Then he asked me, “Why shouldst thou not travel with me to my native country whither I am about to return with Cairene and Alexandrian stuffs? Say me, wilt thou accompany me?”; and I answered “I will.” So I agreed to go with him at the head of the month, and I sold all I had and bought other merchandise; then we set out and travelled, I and the young man, to this country of yours, where he sold his venture and bought other investment of country stuffs and continued his journey to Egypt But it was my lot to abide here, so that these things befell me in my strangerhood which befell last night, and is not this tale, O King of the age, more wondrous and marvellous than the story of the Hunchback? “Not so,” quoth the King, “I cannot accept it: there is no help for it but that you be hanged, every one of you.”—And Shahrazad perceived the dawn of day, and ceased saying her permitted say. When it was the Twenty-seventh Night, She said, It hath reached me, O auspicious King, that when the King of China declared “There is no help for it but that you be hanged,” the Reeve of the Sultan’s Kitchen came forward and said, “If thou permit me I will tell thee a tale of what befell me just before I found this Gobbo, and, if it be more wondrous than his story, do thou grant us our lives.” And when the King answered “Yes” he began to recount The Reeve’s Tale. Know, O King, that last night I was at a party where they made a perfection of the Koran and got together doctors of law and religion skilled in recitation and intoning; and, when the readers ended, the table was spread and amongst other things they set before us was a marinated ragout[FN#553] flavoured with cumin