The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-215

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

and doffed her clothes, and wrapping up in his bag-trousers [FN#425] the purse of gold which he had taken from the Jew and which contained the thousand dinars, he laid it under the edge of the bedding. Then he took off his turband and set it upon the settle [FN#426] atop of his other clothes, remaining in his skull￾cap and fine shirt of blue silk laced with gold. Whereupon the Lady of Beauty drew him to her and he did likewise. Then he took her to his embrace and set her legs round his waist and point-blanked that cannon [FN#427] placed where it battereth down the bulwark of maidenhead and layeth it waste. And he found her a pearl unpierced and unthridden and a filly by all men save himself unridden; and he abated her virginity and had joyance of her youth in his virility and presently he withdrew sword from sheath; and then returned to the fray right eath; and when the battle and the siege had finished, some fifteen assaults he had furnished and she conceived by him that very night. Then he laid his hand under her head and she did the same and they embraced and fell asleep in each other’s arms, as a certain poet said of such lovers in these couplets:— Visit thy lover, spurn what envy told; * No envious churl shall smile on love ensoul’d. Merciful Allah made no fairer sight * Than coupled lovers single couch doth hold; Breast pressing breast and robed in joys their own, * With pillowed forearms cast in finest mould: And when heart speaks to heart with tongue of love, Folk who would part them hammer steel ice-cold: If a fair friend[FN#428] thou find who cleaves to thee, Live for that friend, that friend in heart enfold. O ye who blame for love us lover kind * Say, can ye minister to diseas�d mind? This much concerning Badr al-Hasan and Sitt al-Husn his cousin; but as regards the Ifrit, as soon as he saw the twain asleep, he said to the Ifritah, “Arise, slip thee under the youth and let us carry him back to his place ere dawn overtake us; for the day is nearhand.” Thereupon she came forward and, getting under him as he lay asleep, took him up clad only in his fine blue shirt, leaving the rest of his garments; and ceased not flying (and the Ifrit vying with her in flight) till the dawn advised them that it had come upon them mid-way, and the Muezzin began