The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1 Page-156

The Book Of The Thousand Nights And A Night, Vol 1

A plain and literal translation of the arabian nights entertainments

more clearly,” asked I, “what causeth this weeping which maketh my gall-bladder[FN#291] like to burst;” and they answered, “O our lord and master, it is severance which maketh us weep; and thou, and thou only, art the cause of our tears. If thou hearken to us we need never be parted and if thou hearken not we part for ever; but our hearts tell us that thou wilt not listen to our words and this is the cause of our tears and cries.” “Tell me how the case standeth?” “Know, O our lord, that we are the daughters of Kings who have met here and have lived together for years; and once in every year we are perforce absent for forty days; and afterwards we return and abide here for the rest of the twelve month eating and drinking and taking our pleasure and enjoying delights: we are about to depart according to our custom; and we fear lest after we be gone thou contraire our charge and disobey our injunctions. Here now we commit to thee the keys of the palace which containeth forty chambers and thou mayest open of these thirty and nine, but beware (and we conjure thee by Allah and by the lives of us!) lest thou open the fortieth door, for therein is that which shall separate us for ever.”[FN#292] Quoth I, “Assuredly I will not open it, if it contain the cause of severance from you.” Then one among them came up to me and falling on my neck wept and recited these verses.— “If Time unite us after absent while, * The world harsh frowning on our lot shall smile And if thy semblance deign adorn mine eyes,[FN#293] * I’ll pardon Time past wrongs and by gone guile.” And I recited the following:— “When drew she near to bid adieu with heart unstrung, While care and longing on that day her bosom wrung Wet pearls she wept and mine like red carnelians rolled And, joined in sad rivi�re, around her neck they hung.”