Crime And Punishment Page-178

Crime And Punishment

“Oh, not mad. I must have said too much, brother.... What struck him, you see, was that only that subject seemed to interest you; now it’s clear why it did interest you; knowing all the circumstances... and how that irritated you and worked in with your illness... I am a little drunk, brother, only, confound him, he has some idea of his own... I tell you, he’s mad on mental diseases. But don’t you mind him...” For half a minute both were silent. “Listen, Razumihin,” began Raskolnikov, “I want to tell you plainly: I’ve just been at a death-bed, a clerk who died... I gave them all my money... and besides I’ve just been kissed by someone who, if I had killed anyone, would just the same... in fact I saw someone else there... with a flame-coloured feather... but I am talking nonsense; I am very weak, support me... we shall be at the stairs directly...” “What’s the matter? What’s the matter with you?” Razumihin asked anxiously. “I am a little giddy, but that’s not the point, I am so sad, so sad... like a woman. Look, what’s that? Look, look!” “What is it?” “Don’t you see? A light in my room, you see? Through the crack...” They were already at the foot of the last flight of stairs, at the level of the landlady’s door, and they could, as a fact, see from below that there was a light in Raskolnikov’s garret. “Queer! Nastasya, perhaps,” observed Razumihin. “She is never in my room at this time and she must be in bed long ago, but... I don’t care! Good-bye!” “What do you mean? I am coming with you, we’ll come in together!” “I know we are going in together, but I want to shake hands here and say good-bye to you here. So give me your hand, good-bye!” “What’s the matter with you, Rodya?” “Nothing... come along... you shall be witness.” They began mounting the stairs, and the idea struck Razumihin that perhaps Zossimov might be right after all. “Ah, I’ve upset him with my chatter!” he muttered to himself. When they reached the door they heard voices in the room. “What is it?” cried Razumihin. Raskolnikov was the first to open the door; he flung it wide and stood still in the doorway, dumbfoundered.