Crime And Punishment Page-128

Crime And Punishment

twice as careful with a boy. Oh, you progressive dullards! You don’t understand. You harm yourselves running another man down.... But if you want to know, we really have something in common.” “I should like to know what.” “Why, it’s all about a house-painter.... We are getting him out of a mess! Though indeed there’s nothing to fear now. The matter is absolutely self-evident. We only put on steam.” “A painter?” “Why, haven’t I told you about it? I only told you the beginning then about the murder of the old pawnbroker-woman. Well, the painter is mixed up in it...” “Oh, I heard about that murder before and was rather interested in it... partly... for one reason.... I read about it in the papers, too....” “Lizaveta was murdered, too,” Nastasya blurted out, suddenly addressing Raskolnikov. She remained in the room all the time, standing by the door listening. “Lizaveta,” murmured Raskolnikov hardly audibly. “Lizaveta, who sold old clothes. Didn’t you know her? She used to come here. She mended a shirt for you, too.” Raskolnikov turned to the wall where in the dirty, yellow paper he picked out one clumsy, white flower with brown lines on it and began examining how many petals there were in it, how many scallops in the petals and how many lines on them. He felt his arms and legs as lifeless as though they had been cut off. He did not attempt to move, but stared obstinately at the flower. “But what about the painter?” Zossimov interrupted Nastasya’s chatter with marked displeasure. She sighed and was silent. “Why, he was accused of the murder,” Razumihin went on hotly. “Was there evidence against him then?” “Evidence, indeed! Evidence that was no evidence, and that’s what we have to prove. It was just as they pitched on those fellows, Koch and Pestryakov, at first. Foo! how stupidly it’s all done, it makes one sick, though it’s not one’s business! Pestryakov may be coming to-night.... By the way, Rodya, you’ve heard about the business already; it happened before you were ill, the day before you fainted at the police office while they were talking about it.” Zossimov looked curiously at Raskolnikov. He did not stir. “But I say, Razumihin, I wonder at you. What a busybody you are!” Zossimov